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1. TEA DRINKING CUSTOMS OF THE WORLD Introduction

The history of tea drinking

The home of teaThe history of tea in ChinaThe great age of ocean navigationTea in modern society

About tea

Tea in ChinaTea in EuropeTea in central Asia

The production and effect of tea

The tea plantTea productionThe effect of tea


2. THE TRADITION OF CHANOYU Introduction

History of chanoyu

Introduction of tea into JapanTea as medicineThe popularization of tea drinkingThe establishment of wabi-style teaTea under the shogunsThe formation of schools of chanoyuChanoyu becomes a light accomplishmentChanoyu in the Meiji PeriodThe chanoyu of sukishaChanoyu in the modern age

Portraits of tea devotees

Murata ShukoTakeno JooFuruta Oribe and Kobori EnshuMatsudaira Fumai and Ii Naosuke

Chanoyu and Japanese culture

Wabi and SabiChanoyu and chasukiChanoyu and the classical artsChanoyu and religionChanoyu and folk customs


3. RIKYU'S CHANOYU AND ITS LINEAGE Introduction

The life of Rikyu

Rikyu in his youthRikyu and Nobunaga, HideyoshiThe golden age of the way of tea (sado)Rikyu's later years

Rikyu's chanoyu

Rikyu's tea utensils-from selection to creationRikyu's word-the concept of 'wabi'Rikyu's tea gatherings-the expression of beauty and spirit

Rikyu's tradition-the history of Omotesenke

Rikyu's successors and the revival of the Sen familyEmployment by the Tokugawa family of Kii ProvinceThe separation of the three Sen familiesThe renaissance of chanoyuChanoyu of modern times and today-the decline and revival of sado


4. THE TEA ROOM AND THE TEA GARDEN Introduction

Traditional houses and the tea room

Living with natureBuildings and gardensThe origin of the tatami roomKyoma tatamiDisplaying objects in the zashikiEn (Verandah)-connecting house and gardenThe tea roomThe perfection of the soan tea roomThe special characteristics of a soan-style tea roomThe tea room and the tea gardenHiroma (Large tea rooms) and koma (Small tea rooms)

Techniques and materials

Giving form to chanoyuMarutazukuri (Using logs in the tea room)Making the most of bambooClay wallsA solid structure

Omotesenke's tea rooms and gardens

The Juraku residenceThe restoration of the Sen family residenceSotan's one-and-a-half mat Fushin'an tea roomKoshin's Fushin'anOmotesenke before the Great Fire of 1788After the Great Fire of Tenmei,-The structure of the tea garden up to the present dayFrom the Nakakuguri gateway to the Zangetsutei tea roomFushin'an and the inner tea gardenThe Shichijo tea roomSodo (Founder's Hall)The Hogobari tea roomThe new practice room (Keikoba)The appearance of the Omotesenke


5. FORMS AND BEHAVIOR Introduction

Etiquette and practice

Gentle behaviorDrinking teaAbout practice

Holding a tea gathering

Preparation for a tea gatheringAbout tea gatheringsChanoyu's almanac

The progress of a tea event

About tea eventsThe day of the tea event-in the yoritsuki (anteroom)The first half of the tea event-greeting the guests, the first charcoal procedure, kaiseki cuisine, sweetsThe second half of the tea event-the middle break, thick tea, the second charcoal procedure, thin tea, leaving the tea roomFlowers for the tea roomTea cuisineTea sweets


6. TEA UTENSILS Introduction

The merits of utensils

Works of art and tea utensils (appreciation and use)Co-ordinating utensils in the tea roomColour, form and nameTea gathering recordsUtensil box inscriptionsUtensils handed down

The world of utensils

Chinese, Korean and Japanese utensilsFamous utensils (meibutsu)Shin-gyo-so (formal semi-formal, informal) ranking of utensils

'Mitate' (utensils originally used for another purpose) and 'Konomimono' (utensils designed by the Iemoto)

'Mitate''Konomimono'Senke's ten designated craftsmen families



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